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What’s This About?

“A Jew, Mormon, Muslim, Atheist, and Christian walk into the data center…”

“Technically Religious” is a podcast by IT practitioners with decades of experience, who also have a strong connection to their faith. We talk about how we make our passion for technology mesh with our religious principles, where those two things conflict and where they combine to be greater than the sum of the parts.

Catch up to all our episodes below, or subscribe to your favorite podcast app, or search our site for topics of interest.

2 Comments

  1. Thomas Iannelli April 3, 2019

    I have listened to several episodes and it has raised a lot of questions. But the one that will not leave me alone at this point is this:

    How does your belief system’s teachings about gratitude help you survive as an IT professional? Given all the horror stories we can tell about end users, customers, family members, and friends you just don’t get what you do, and have unrealistic expectations of you at times, it can make you want to run screaming to another career. Then you look around and go, I am a geek, byte-head, nerd. What other profession could I go into? What does that look like from this distance? Is it better or worse? In what ways? Then you start thinking about being grateful where what you have, not settling or accepting less. But appreciating what aspects of where you are currently at are really quiet good. Better than most. I need to be grateful for those things. It doesn’t mean you won’t get upset or angry or be disappointed, but a sense of gratitude can help one not spiral into a deep whole of despair and make rash decisions.

    • Josh Biggley April 5, 2019

      It feels like cheating to answer this question as one of the co-hosts, but I absolutely believe that our system of beliefs can help us survive in *any* job.

      Interestingly, I never wanted to work in IT. I spent my entire high school career preparing to be a lawyer. I even refused to take advanced level math courses because I felt my love of computing (and I *did* love computing) was just a odd, geeky thing. Being a computer geek in the 90s was not a badge of honour!

      I remember the exact moment my wife and I decided that I was going to pursue an IT career. That was more than 20 years ago and I haven’t looked back (too often!) since then.

      Coincidentally, I had two friends who decided to enter the IT field at the same time. We were all Mormon and attended the same congregation. They had both complete undergraduate degrees, but had been unable to find gainful employment in their respective fields. I had no degree, but was leaping into an intensive 6-month MCSE boot-camp style course to fill that gap.

      I was the only one that completed the course and became fully certified. After 2 decades, I am the only one that is still in the field. Why does it matter? We were all Mormon, so it *wasn’t* our religious beliefs that allowed us to work in IT, but it *was* a system of beliefs that we had that drove us to do what we did. I was raised in a home where hard work was demonstrated through 60-70 hour work weeks as the norm. I learned that working hard was often the differentiation between you and the person next to you.

      I definitely agree that a system of beliefs can help us be successful, but it isn’t exclusive to the beliefs found within a dogmatic system.

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